F A L U L A L U L A F

nemertea:

STAAAAAAAHP.

BEFORE I HURT MYSELF.

sixpenceee:

Lascaux Caves

Lascaux Caves is a complex of caves in southwestern France that is famous for its Paleolithic cave paintings. They contain 900 of the most perfect surviving examples of Upper Paleolithic art. These paintings are estimated to be 17,300 years old. They primarily consist of images of large animals, most of which are known from fossil evidence to have lived in the area at the time.

The caves have been banned to the public since 1963.  Any human presence in the caves is regarded as potentially destructive

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musts:

by © Alejandro Arteaga { website }
Condor Glassfrog (Centrolene condor)

musts:

by © Alejandro Arteaga { website }

Condor Glassfrog (Centrolene condor)

feelings are weird

vexedvixin:

Booka Shade: Night Falls

awkwardsituationist:

the remote, secluded and little known rice terraces of yuanyang county in china’s yunnan province were built by the hani people along the contours of ailao mountain range five hundred years ago during the ming dynasty. during the early spring season, when these photos were taken, the terraces, once planted, are irrigated with spring water from the forest above, which reflect sunlight to create these images.

photos by jialiang gao, javarman, isabelle chauvel and thierry bornier
(previous posts on the rice terraces of the philippines and vietnam)

"I feel it, you know. I can’t help feeling it."
— Fyodor Dostoevsky, from The Brothers Karamazov    (via seulray)
libutron:

Blue-ringed octopus: a beauty to look at but don’t touch
Blue-Ringed octopuses are very small organisms, belonging to the genus Hapalochlaena (Cephalopoda - Octopodidae). They are the size of a golf ball but its venom is powerful enough to kill an adult human in minutes. The bite might be painless, but this octopus secrets a neuromuscular paralyzing venom. 
The venom is not injected but is contained in the octopus’s saliva, which comes from two glands each as big as its brain. The venom contains some maculotoxin, a substance more violent than any found on land animals. This substance blocks the nerve conduction and causes neuromuscular paralysis, followed by death. The venom also contains tetrodotoxin, which blocks sodium channels and causes motor paralysis and occasionally respiratory failure. Though with fixed dilated pupils, the senses of the victims are often intact, they are aware but unable to respond.
There’s no known antidote, but the victim might be saved if artificial respiration starts before marked cyanosis and hypotension develops. The only treatment is hours of heart massage and artificial respiration until the toxin has worked its way out of your system.
Some symptoms that may be experienced when the toxin enters the system are: onset of nausea, hazy vision (within seconds you are blind), loss of sense of touch, speech and the ability to swallow.  
Although the painless bite can kill an adult, injuries have only occurred when an octopus has been picked out of its pool and provoked or stepped on. So be careful in the Australian beaches, and, please, don’t touch this cute octopus.
Blue-Ringed Octopus Bite First Aid: 
1.- This bite is considered a medical emergency so do not wait for symptoms to develop; quickly get the person bitten out of the water and, if possible, call the emergency number and consider transport to the nearest hospital.
2.- Use the pressure immobilization technique: wrap the limb with an elastic bandage. It should be tight, but the fingers and toes should remain pink so that the circulation is not cut off. The extremity should also be immobilized  with a splint or stick of some sort. The elastic bandage should be removed for 90 seconds every 10 minutes and then reapplied for the first 4 to 6 hours (hopefully medical care can be received within this time period). If 30 minutes or more has passed since the blue-octopus bite, the pressure immobilization technique is not likely to be helpful.
3.- If the victim is having difficulty breathing, assist with mouth-to-mouth ventilation. 
When a victim is kept alive the poison gradually wears off after 24h, apparently leaving no side effects.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Bjørn Christian Tørrissen | Locality: Sidney, Australia

libutron:

Blue-ringed octopus: a beauty to look at but don’t touch

Blue-Ringed octopuses are very small organisms, belonging to the genus Hapalochlaena (Cephalopoda - Octopodidae). They are the size of a golf ball but its venom is powerful enough to kill an adult human in minutesThe bite might be painless, but this octopus secrets a neuromuscular paralyzing venom

The venom is not injected but is contained in the octopus’s saliva, which comes from two glands each as big as its brain. The venom contains some maculotoxin, a substance more violent than any found on land animals. This substance blocks the nerve conduction and causes neuromuscular paralysis, followed by death. The venom also contains tetrodotoxin, which blocks sodium channels and causes motor paralysis and occasionally respiratory failure. Though with fixed dilated pupils, the senses of the victims are often intact, they are aware but unable to respond.

There’s no known antidote, but the victim might be saved if artificial respiration starts before marked cyanosis and hypotension develops. The only treatment is hours of heart massage and artificial respiration until the toxin has worked its way out of your system.

Some symptoms that may be experienced when the toxin enters the system are: onset of nausea, hazy vision (within seconds you are blind), loss of sense of touch, speech and the ability to swallow.  

Although the painless bite can kill an adult, injuries have only occurred when an octopus has been picked out of its pool and provoked or stepped on. So be careful in the Australian beaches, and, please, don’t touch this cute octopus.

Blue-Ringed Octopus Bite First Aid: 

1.- This bite is considered a medical emergency so do not wait for symptoms to develop; quickly get the person bitten out of the water and, if possible, call the emergency number and consider transport to the nearest hospital.

2.- Use the pressure immobilization technique: wrap the limb with an elastic bandage. It should be tight, but the fingers and toes should remain pink so that the circulation is not cut off. The extremity should also be immobilized  with a splint or stick of some sort. The elastic bandage should be removed for 90 seconds every 10 minutes and then reapplied for the first 4 to 6 hours (hopefully medical care can be received within this time period). If 30 minutes or more has passed since the blue-octopus bite, the pressure immobilization technique is not likely to be helpful.

3.- If the victim is having difficulty breathing, assist with mouth-to-mouth ventilation. 

When a victim is kept alive the poison gradually wears off after 24h, apparently leaving no side effects.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Bjørn Christian Tørrissen | Locality: Sidney, Australia

forgotn1:

"I fucked up, guys. I fucked up."

forgotn1:

"I fucked up, guys. I fucked up."

http://cosimas-science.tumblr.com/post/92615453504/sciencesoup-dna-replication-the-process-this

sciencesoup:

DNA Replication: The Process

This process is the foundation of who we are—without it, our cells could not reproduce, and we wouldn’t be able to live. I’ll run through the basic process, then let the proteins do the talking for me.

Essentially, in replication, the double helix…

brainstuffshow:

Not thrilled that this man fed a marmot to a dog, but bubonic plague locking down a town is a horrible consequence.

Officials have blocked off a city in northern China and placed 151 people in quarantine after a man died of bubonic plague last week, Agence France Presse reports. The 38-year-old victim in the city of Yumen was infected after feeding his dog a dead marmot, a large squirrel-like creature, earlier this month. He developed a fever later that same day and died last Wednesday.
Read more…

IMAGE: NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES

brainstuffshow:

Not thrilled that this man fed a marmot to a dog, but bubonic plague locking down a town is a horrible consequence.

Officials have blocked off a city in northern China and placed 151 people in quarantine after a man died of bubonic plague last week, Agence France Presse reports. The 38-year-old victim in the city of Yumen was infected after feeding his dog a dead marmot, a large squirrel-like creature, earlier this month. He developed a fever later that same day and died last Wednesday.

Read more…

IMAGE: NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES

biomorphosis:

Raccoon dogs look very similar to raccoons but have no genetic similarities between them. They belong to the Canidae family, which are known to have distinct dog and wolf like characteristics and appearance. These animals are both carnivorous and omnivorous mammals.

They are monogamous and will mate for life. It is only if the mate dies or is killed, will the other search for a new mate. Two mates will hibernate in one den. During this period they will maintain close body contact to keep each other warm and will groom each other as well. This is a trait not practiced by canines, as dogs neither hibernate and nor are they monogamous in nature.

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